Anonymous continues its campaign against Iran

Anonymous continues its campaign against Iran

The hacktivist collective Anonymous has focused its operations on Iran since widespread protests began this month and claims to have compromised numerous websites belonging to the Iranian government – including that of the Iranian Assembly, the country’s parliament.

Known for taking sides in major international conflicts, Anonymous said on September 20 that he was launching a “cyber operation” against the Iranian regime. He planned to support protesters across the country who were protesting the death of Mahsa Amini.

Amini, who had traveled to Tehran from Kurdistan to visit relatives, died in police custody after being detained by the country’s vice squad for wearing her hijab incorrectly. Although police say she suffered a heart attack, leaked medical scans show a cracked skull and internal bleeding. She was taken to hospital, where she was later declared brain dead.

Amini’s death sparked mass protests across Iran.

Hackers apparently belonging to Anonymous attacked Iran’s two main government websites on September 20, as well as a number of media websites. One of the government sites allegedly attacked was the “intelligent services” website, which offers a variety of online services. Another aimed to publish government news, as well as interviews with officials.

“Iran’s biggest media is hacked,” said a tweet from Anonymous’s official Twitter account.

Several other websites went down and recovered multiple times the next day, suggesting an ongoing struggle between hackers and maintenance crews.

In recent days, the people of Iran have been exposed to persistent internet outages as the government attempts to quell the protests.

In response, Anonymous provided Iranians with advice on how to get around the restrictions.

“After Instagram, WhatsApp is now restricted in Iran. Dear Iranians, use ‘Tor’ to bypass it,” he said in a tweet.

The hackers also took over more than 300 Iranian cameras, using them to post videos of the protests.

The cyberattacks on Iran are reminiscent of Anonymous’s cyberwarfare against Russia in retaliation for its invasion of Ukraine.

Since the beginning of the Ukrainian crisis, Anonymous has claimed responsibility for attacks against a number of Russian organisations. The group declared its support for Western allies, stating that it would only attack Russian operations.

Since the beginning of the Ukrainian crisis, Anonymous has claimed responsibility for attacks against a number of Russian organisations. The group declared its support for Western allies, stating that it would only attack Russian operations.

Like the attacks in Iran, Anonymous began its campaign against Russia by hacking local media. In March, he hacked into state television and streaming services, including Russia 24, Channel One, Moscow 24, Wink and Ivi, to show images of the conflict in Ukraine to ordinary Russians.

The group also said it breached Rosneft Deutschland – the German subsidiary of Russian energy company Rosneft – and stole 20 terabytes of data from its systems.

The attacks then shifted to the private sector. In June, he claimed to have obtained the strategies and plans of a Russian manufacturer of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), after hacking into the company’s systems.

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.